The connection between the gut microbiota and the aetiology of obesity and cardiometabolic disorders is increasingly being recognized by clinicians. Our gut microbiota might affect the cardiometabolic phenotype by fermenting indigestible dietary components and thereby producing short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). These SCFA are not only of importance in gut health and as signalling molecules, but might also enter the systemic circulation and directly affect metabolism or the function of peripheral tissues. In this Review, we discuss the effects of three SCFA (acetate, propionate and butyrate) on energy homeostasis and metabolism, as well as how these SCFA can beneficially modulate adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver tissue function. As a result, these SCFA contribute to improved glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, we also summarize the increasing evidence for a potential role of SCFA as metabolic targets to prevent and counteract obesity and its associated disorders in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. However, most data are derived from animal and in vitro studies, and consequently the importance of SCFA and differential SCFA availability in human energy and substrate metabolism remains to be fully established. Well-controlled human intervention studies investigating the role of SCFA on cardiometabolic health are, therefore, eagerly awaited.

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http://www.nature.com/nrendo/journal/v11/n10/full/nrendo.2015.128.html

 

GPR SCFA fermentation nature reviews

Main pathways of energy metabolism for dietary fats, fiber and carbohydrates. Fermentation of indigestible fiber and resistant starch to SCFA
Photo credit: Nature Reviews
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